Migraines Headaches Causes and Help

Headaches are a Pain

headachesMost of us have suffered from a headache or two. The headache may last for a hour or so, or can seem to be with us all day. Some people will just suffer the headache with the confidence that it will ease and pass with time. Others will reach for medication in the form of paracetamol, aspirin or other pills to attempt to get quicker relief. Sometimes headaches arise as one of a group of symptoms connected to another health issue such as influenza. For the most part headaches are infrequent and resolvable.

Re-occurring Headaches

For a few people a headache might occur frequently and become a regular issue. If this is the case it is very important to see your medical practitioner for advice and maybe further investigations. Repeated headaches can be a symptom of more health serious issues that will need addressing quickly. Headaches re-occur can be a sign that we need a new pair of glasses and a visit to the optician is called for. However never seld-diagnose the causes of repeated headaches. If nothing else you will get some peace of mind by visiting your doctor and explaining what you have been experiencing.

Migraine Headaches Symptoms, Signs

According to the NHS website migraine headaches may br ing a throbbing sensation to the front or one side of the head. Nausea may be felt and sensitivity to light. Some migraines give early warning signs (with aura – eg. vision difficulties) that a severe headache is about to start and for others there are no warning signs (without aura)

Those migraines with aura at least give the headache sufferer a chance to take medication as soon as possible to try and head off a full blown migraine.

Migraines can be so severe that it can restrict someone’s work and social life with rest needed before they can return to everyday activities again. It is said that 25% of women can suffer from migraines and about 8% of men and the difference is thought to be caused by hormones although this has not been proved conclusively.

Persistant Headaches and Migraines

It is possible to suffer from severe and debiltating headaches that have a large psychological element to them. In fact there will be a psychological element to all repetitious headaches. Have you ever heard someone says “Oh no, he always gives me a headache” or “I hate those meetings I always end up with a headache”. These expressions  clearly indicate an expectation that a headache will arise and a connection to a person or an event.

Even headaches and migraines that have a recognised physical, hormonal or other element to them may be eased by tackling and resolving emotional issues. If you know you are getting the early signs of a migraine you may start tensing up. Tension in the body is not a helpful state and it is likely to increase the intensity of the migraine.

EFT for Migraines and Headaches

Once you have seen your doctor and they have diagnosed the type of headache you have, you may want to seek additional forms of help in managing migraines and headaches. When an emotional component is identified with EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) it is often possible resolve or at least reduce the intensity of the headache.

EFT as you will see is a very simple process and it can also be used in the form of self-help. This means that wherever you are when you sense a headache starting you can begin to do something to ease it and feel more in control.

If you would like to find out more about how your migraine or severe headaches may be helped with EFT in London you can book the free initial consultation with Steven Harold, EFT Therapist. Just email him here steve@emotional-freedom-technique.org for help with migraines and headaches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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